Articles Tagged with gender discrimination attorney

As the #MeToo movement has proven, it’s tough being a woman in the workplace, particularly working in a male-dominated field. Evenage discrimination tougher, it seems, is the discrimination women face as they get older and try to maintain their standing in their professional careers. Many face a different set of standards as they age than their male counterparts, according to an examination by Forbes. Men’s age is often seen as a symbol of experience, status, wisdom, and leadership capabilities. Even if they lack the modern skills some younger people bring to the workforce, they are typically valued for the knowledge they can share with those inexperienced in the field. For women, though, their age can be construed as a sign that they are outdated, out-of-touch, and lacking technical abilities. Sadly, physical appearance is frequently a factor is these discriminatory practices, with men’s appearances being viewed more favorably as they age.

Ageism and sexism run deep in our society, so some might not even be aware they are mentally perceiving their employees differently. But hidden biases are not an excuse to give employees unequal treatment. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, Sec. 623 clearly states it is unlawful to fail or refuse to hire someone because of their age, or to discriminate in any way including compensation or terms, conditions, and privileges of employment. The law also prohibits classifying or segregating an employee in such a way that deprives them of opportunities other employees enjoy as a result of his or her age. Reduction of wages due to a person’s age is also illegal. Of course consideration of a person’s sex was already prohibited in workplace hiring, firing, and promotion matters based on Title VII of the civil rights Act of 1964.

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Frustrated with stagnant negotiations with city leaders, the teachers’ union in Boston is accusing the city of gender discrimination and bias. teacher

The union is comprised mostly of women, and talks regarding a new contract between the union and the city have been stalled for a good year now. The president of the union noted that more than three-fourths of the city’s teachers are women, and the city has repeatedly treated them poorly and with disrespect. He asserted that there was “little doubt” that if the union were male-dominated rather than female-dominated that a contract would have been settled long ago.

According to The Boston Globe, city spokespersons declined to respond to allegations of gender discrimination, except to say that conversations between the two sides are still underway and that the city “hopes” for a faster resolution that will ultimately help to best serve the students in the district. Continue reading

During a recent Senate confirmation hearing to the post of Health and Human Services Secretary, Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.), stated he did not believe companies were allowed to terminate women from their jobs for their reproductive choices. Specifically, he indicated that the right to use birth control was not something that affected women’s employment status.pregnant

In fact, as our gender discrimination attorneys know, this is far from true.

Price is a conservative politician, and as such, he has been vocal and active in his anti-abortion stance. And in 2015, he voted for a resolution that would have eliminated protections for women in the District of Columbia from being fired due to their reproductive health choices. That resolution indicated at the top that it opposed the vote by the D.C. Council in favor of the Reproductive Health Non-Discrimination Act, the purpose of which is to shield women from discrimination at work on the basis of the decisions they make in favor of their reproductive health. However, a the recent confirmation hearing, he insisted that the measure he voted for in D.C. would not have meant that employers could discriminate against workers based on their reproductive choices. In a back-and-forth with Sen. Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.), Price stated he did not think employers ought to be able to or are currently allowed to discriminate against someone based on their health status or the medications (including birth control) that they use.  Continue reading

Three women who reached settlements in their gender discrimination claims against a city and local police department in Iowa say that while the compensation has vindicated them, they have lost much over the last few years. They lost their jobs, of course. But says her once promising career was effectively ended. All say their lives won’t ever be the same.police

One described it as the most difficult time her life. She used to wonder why women wouldn’t come forward with complaints about discrimination, why it was so under-reported. Now, sadly, she knows.

“You’re second-guessed and your told that you’re making things up,” she said. “You’re told that you’re crazy.”  Continue reading

A black, transgender man is accusing GE (General Electric) of discrimination, sexual harassment and retaliation after he was reportedly fired from his job of two years. He cites the treatment he received prior to his supervisors learning that he was transgender versus after. The complainant alleges in an employment lawsuit the company violated not only federal and state laws, but also a city ordinance that prohibits workplace discrimination.bathroomsign

While the company insists plaintiff was fired for repeated tardiness, plaintiff says there is a good reason for that. He said rather than allowing him to use the male bathroom near his work station, he was forced to use a bathroom that was much farther, on the other side of the property. Then when he returned, he would be reprimanded for returning late from his breaks.

The worker was employed on the production line at the company. On one occasion, he was pulled off the line to meet with a supervisor. It was during that meeting that he revealed he was transgender. From that point forward, he says, he was singled out repeatedly and go additional reprimands for alleged offenses that co-workers were not called out for. Continue reading

These days we have been hearing a lot about which bathroom a transgender individual is allowed to use.  While this has not been a major issue for decades, especially in places like Los Angeles, a recent attempt in North Carolina to ban transgendered individuals from using the bathroom of their choosing through what has become known as a “bathroom bill” is what brought this issue back into spotlight.

rainbow-flag-1144037Specifically, the state governor passed what is officially called the Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act.  The act claims to be for the purpose of creating statewide consistency in bathrooms by making them all single-sex occupancy.  Essentially, it claims it will be safer and more consistent if a person uses the restroom that is for the gender to which they were assigned at birth as opposed to the gender to which they currently identify if they are transgender.  It is obviously why many people see this as an anti-transgender bill, and many think it violates the civil liberties protected by the constitution.  Continue reading

According to a recent news article from the Los Angeles Times, an analyst working for the Irvine Water District is claiming workplace harassment and discrimination based up both her race and gender.

water-faucet-1193765Employee filed a lawsuit in Orange County Superior Court, alleging that her supervisor at the water district disrespected her on multiple occasions and threatened her like she was his “personal servant.” The Los Angeles Times attempted to reach the supervisor named in the lawsuit and a spokesperson for the water district, and both said they were unaware a lawsuit had been filed. Continue reading

A high-profile gender discrimination and retaliation lawsuit is underway in Silicon Valley, with one of the area’s oldest venture capital firms in the center of the storm. technology

In her complaint, Ellen Pao claims she was subjected to five years of retaliation after she refused sexual advances from several of the senior partners at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. As a former partner of the firm, she stated she and other female workers were discriminated against when it came to matters of pay and promotions. She also said she was pressured into having an affair with a senior executive, and after she ended it, the discrimination began – and continued for the better part of five years. She is seeking $16 million in compensation for back pay, future wage losses and other damages as a result of the alleged discriminatory conduct.

The case is being closely watched as it has underscored longstanding issues of sexual inequality in the field of technology. As a result, many technological firms have started releasing diversity data regarding their workforces, and have vowed to make improvements with regard to racial and gender balances.