Articles Tagged with Riverside employment lawyer

With the ever-expanding reach of technology, it feels to many like privacy is dwindling. This can be especially distressing when an employer tries to useemployee rights private information about you to take employment action.

There are more ways than ever for an employer to access information about you, but as our trusted employment attorneys know, companies are still limited in how they can use that information under the law. A recent article from The Business Journals delved into this very issue, unveiling different platforms on which employers can easily access your information.

Social media is, of course, the most obvious change in the way we share information over the past 15 years. It’s good common sense to be thoughtful about what you share about yourself, especially with so many new online outlets to post personal information with friends and family. You never know who might see one of your posts and share it with the wrong person. Plus, it’s not uncommon for an employer to scope out your online presence when you apply for a job.

They still cannot discriminate against you for any reason that is already protected under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, such as race, religion, or nation of origin. However, if you have a series of public statuses about how much you don’t like going to work or making fun of your previous bosses, don’t be surprised if you aren’t getting many bites from prospective employers. Continue reading

When employees work in helping professions, they generally expect their supervisors and co-workers to share values of compassion and empathy. Unfortunately, racialrace discrimination discrimination, harassment and bullying can rear their ugly heads nearly anywhere, even among people who do good for a living. These in turn give rise to employment lawsuits.

The Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services in Connecticut is currently grappling with a flood of such accusations among its staff. Recently, 40 employees came forward to share their stories during a forum, hosted by members of the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities. After hearing a myriad of accounts of targeted attacks against staff members, State Sen. Len Suzio (R-Meriden) called for the state to open a formal investigation into reported systemic discrimination practices, according to an article from Record-Journal. Most of the accusations detailed instances of discrimination based on color, race, ancestry and national origin.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 explicitly forbids discrimination of employees based on “race, color, religion, sex, and national origin.” U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission defines one aspect of race discrimination as treating someone unfavorably because he/she is of a certain race or because of personal characteristics associated with that race. This applies to all steps in the employment cycle, including the hiring process, training, promotions, and dismissals.  Continue reading

The events of 2017 surrounding Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein and the many sexual assault and harassment allegations against him are continuing to cause aRiverside sexual harassment lawyer ripple effect far beyond his region and industry. From people opening up a national dialogue with the #metoo movement to businesses fortifying their sexual harassment policies and training to investigations and stronger laws against predators, this past year has truly been an awakening to the pervasive inappropriate and dangerous behaviors in the workplace and the general public.

The state of Washington is among those examining proposals in response to these revelations that would bolster workplace protections in regards to sexual harassment and bullying and empower victims to come forward.

According to a report from WNPA Olympia News Bureau, among the bills under consideration by the Washington State Legislature is SB 5996, which would dismantle the practice of employers using non-disclosure agreements to restrict the abilities of employees to report misconduct in the work place. The bill outlines that such an agreement would not hold up as a protection in court for accused employers. Continue reading

Anyone who has worked at any job has likely seen someone get injured on the job. Whether we are talking about an employee falling and injuring an ankle, or a factory worker who is in a fatal accident, accidents happen all the time.  Not only do accidents happen to employees themselves, but employees also cause accidents.

employment Lawsuits LAOne question that often arises is when an employee is injured at an off-site location the employer does not want to compensate them because of what is known as an employee classification issue.  If a worker is an independent contractor, as opposed to a statutory employee, they will not be entitled to workers’ compensation, overtime pay, benefits, and other protections afforded to employees. Continue reading

Employees who file workers’ compensation claims may run the risk of possible retaliation by employers who want to avoid paying the associated costs. The majority of states have laws that prohibit companies from lashing out against workers who have filed workers’ compensation claims.assembly

Workers seeking to prove retaliation have to show:

  • He or she was an employee entitled to receive benefits under California’s workers’ compensation law;
  • He or she took some protected action (i.e., filing a workers’ compensation claim)
  • He or she suffered an adverse employment action (i.e., termination, denial of promotion, etc.)
  • The employer was motivated to carry out this adverse action by employee engaging in protected activity.

It’s not an easy threshold to meet, and that’s why having an experienced employment lawyer on your side can be critical. Continue reading